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Orthodontics

Adult Orthodontic Treatment

We can straighten teeth at any age

Until the 1980s, a steel band went around each individual tooth like a ring. The wire that pulled the teeth into line was attached to a little bracket that was on the front of the steel bands. You may remember what this looked like- a mouth full of metal.

Today, orthodontic treatment is different.

Fortunately, metal bands have been replaced with brackets that are bonded with an adhesive right to the front of the teeth. They're much more comfortable, smaller in size than an unpopped kernel of popcorn and much less noticeable.

Clear brackets are also available, but they're usually more expensive and tougher to keep clean. A stainless steel or nickel titanium wire still connects the brackets, and different sizes provide the pressure to move the teeth. Elastics that now come in many different colors hold the wire in place. Special elastic bands may be added to speed up teeth movement.

How do braces move teeth?

It’s amazing how far orthodontic treatment can move teeth through bone. Your bone responds to the tension created by these brackets and wires by making special cells on each side of a tooth. These cells remove bone on one side of the tooth and make bone on the opposite side. That’s what allows the tooth to move.

It’s harder to clean your teeth once braces are on, so regular cleaning appointments are more important than ever. Permanent white stains or cavities may form on teeth when plaque and food debris isn't regularly removed. After treatment, retainers are used to hold the teeth in their new alignment. Some retainers are designed to be removable, while others are cemented into place.

Orthodontics Diagnosis

Malocclusions and Orthodontics

Malocclusion is the dental term for teeth that don’t fit together properly. Literally, malocclusion means ‘bad bite.’ Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects malocclusions and brings your teeth into proper alignment.

Causes and types of malocclusions

Some people are lucky and naturally have straight teeth. Others aren't as lucky. The size of your teeth and how they fit into your jaw are inherited traits, and malocclusion can often affect several generations. Besides genetics, malocclusions can also be caused by-
  • Accidents or disease
  • A missing tooth, which allows the teeth around the open space to shift
  • Habits such as thumb sucking, which can put pressure on teeth
There are many types of malocclusions. Your upper or lower jaw may be too far in or out. There may not be enough space in your mouth for your teeth to develop properly, leading to crowding. On the other hand, you might have too much space between your teeth, allowing them to shift, or your teeth may be in cross bite, which means that one or more of your upper teeth bite inside your lower teeth.

Importance of Treatment

A malocclusion that isn't corrected properly can affect your profile and appearance. Poorly aligned teeth can also contribute to tooth decay, bone destruction, loss of teeth, and jaw joint problems. These may, in turn, cause headaches, difficulty in opening and closing your mouth, clicking and popping sounds, and sore, painful jaw muscles.

Correcting your bite through orthodontic treatment can improve your dental health, and it has the added bonus of boosting your self-confidence and giving you a terrific looking smile.

Child Orthodontics

Malocclusions and Orthodontics

Malocclusion is the dental term for teeth that don't fit together properly. Literally, malocclusion means 'bad bite.' Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that corrects malocclusions to bring your child’s teeth into proper alignment.

Causes and Types of Malocclusions

Some children are lucky and naturally have straight teeth. Others aren’t so lucky. The size of a child’s teeth and how they fit into the jaw are inherited traits, and malocclusion can often affect several generations. Besides genetics, a bad bite can also be caused by-
  • Accidents or disease
  • A missing tooth, allowing the teeth around the open space to shift. This is especially likely in children when some of their adult teeth come in late.
  • Habits, such as thumb sucking, which can put pressure on teeth

There are many types of malocclusions. Your child's upper or lower jaw may be too far out or too far in. there may not be enough space in his or her mouth for the adult teeth to develop properly, leading to crowding. On the other hand, there might be too much space between the teeth, allowing them to shift. Your child’s teeth may also be in cross bite, which means that one of more of the upper teeth bite inside the lower teeth instead on top of them.

We recommend starting most orthodontic treatment between 10 and 14 years of age, when the mouth is still developing and teeth are more easily straightened. Early treatment can prevent more extensive and costly treatment later, when your child becomes an adult.

Importance of Treatment

A malocclusion that isn't corrected can affect your child's confidence, profile and appearance. Poorly aligned teeth can also contribute to tooth decay, bone destruction, loss of teeth and jaw-joint problems. These may, in turn, cause headaches, difficulty in opening and closing the mouth, clicking and popping sound, and sore and painful jaw muscles.
Correcting your child's bite through orthodontic treatment can improve their dental health, and it has the added bonus of boosting self-confidence and creating a terrific-looking smile. 
 

Importance of Good Home Care

A beautiful smile won't happen without patient compliance and excellent home care!  At Family Dental Center you will receive all the tools and proper instructions to help you achieve your smile.